Sun protection is an important concern for all Australian citizens. For caring parents, this concern is multiplied. In light of a recent study published in Cancer Epidemology, Biomarkers and Prevention, doctors are now calling for parents to pay greater attention to their children’s skin care. The article suggests that the likelihood of obtaining the most dangerous form of skin cancer, melanoma, is greatly influenced by sun exposure during childhood. Women that had experienced at least five instances of blistering sunburn in their childhood were far more likely to obtain one of the three most common skin cancer variations than those who had not, and of these three cancers, melanoma was the most frequently experienced by these at-risk patients.

The study focused on over 100,000 white, women respondents for a period of twenty years. This means, while it certainly remains important for individuals of all ages to engage in appropriate sun protection for their skin, children are the most at risk. In light of this understanding, the establishment of positive skin care practices at an early age are likely to have the most positive impact upon health, even if these practices decline in their quality over time.

Unfortunately, this does not mean older individuals are free from fear of cancer. Perhaps the most recent development in this regard is the evolution of colorectal cancer screening processes. In the past thirty years, screening for this form of cancer has almost doubled. This correlates with a substantial reduction of almost 30% in incidences of colorectal cancer. For individuals experiencing cancer, their friends and families, and even for simply concerned individuals, this must be looked upon as good news. The continued study and research of this terrible affliction is making definite progress in the quality of human health.